free web hosting | free website | Business Hosting Services | Free Website Submission | shopping cart | php hosting

Home (Main Index)

Email Us (any questions welcome)

Places

   Beleriand

   Eldamar

   Eriador

   Arnor

   Rhovannion

   Rhûn

   Rohan

   Gondor

   Mordor

Time

   First Age

   Second Age

   Third Age

   Fourth Age

   Fifth Age

People

   Men (Aphadrim)

   Elves (Eldar)

   Dwarves (Khazad)

   Hobbits (Periannath)

Eldarin Language Resources

Other Language Resources

Formal/Informal

When speaking especially, and somewhat in writing as well, there is a slight difference in sentence structure when speaking either formally or commonly, or even informally. This is not quite is notable as in Spanish or some other languages, but in some small ways it exists, and this is important to know.

First of all, it is needed to know when to use which level of speech. Polite/formal is used, obviously, during formal occasions or when speaking to a person of authority; also when writing correspondence between non-familiars. Common/informal speech is what is usually used among people who are of same or similar social standing, and in correspondence between friends. Familiar speech is used only between those who are very close; family and the dearest of friends.

Do not feel overwhelmed. There is not much to remember.

******

Questions

1.) How to form a question with an interrogative (Ex. “Who began it?”)

Formal, polite: The interrogative follows the verb. (Heria mai den?)

Common: The interrogative begins the sentence. (Mai heria den?)

Very informal, familiar:  The interrogative begins the sentence. (Mai heria den?)

2.) How to form a question without an interrogative (Ex. “Racel began it?”)

Formal, polite: Reverse the normal placing of subject noun or pronoun and verb. (Heria Racel den?)

Common: Reverse the normal placing of subject noun or pronoun and verb. (Heria Racel den?)

Very informal, familiar: Leave noun/pronoun and verb in their usual place and describe question only by question mark or voice tone. (Racel heria den?)

 

Pronouns – see Pronoun page for meanings. Differences are italicized for quick clarity.

 

person Formal, polite Common Very informal, familiar
1st im, nin, anim, annen, enni im, nin, nín, annen, enni im, nin, -en, -ne, annen, enni
2nd lle, lín, allen, ellin le, lin, allen, ellin le, -el, allen, ellin
 

Third person and plural first person (“we”) remain same